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spring 2010 chick order

I ordered 5 Birchen Cochin bantams and 5 Hamburgs. They shipped on 4/19 and arrived early on 4/21, bright eyed and jumping all over the place. The...
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Buff Ducklings

Starting at: $6.28

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Qty Discounts New Price
1-24
$6.28
25-49
$5.58
50-99
$5.28
100+
$4.88
* Discounts may vary based on options above


Baby Buff Ducklings

Hatching February to November.

Buff Ducks are good all-around ducks. They are good layers and also make good meat birds.

Production: Female Buff Ducks lay between 150 and 220 white eggs per year, making them excellent for production. Buffs reach a mature weight quickly - 8-10 weeks - so they are good meat ducks as well.

Temperament: Buff Ducks are friendly and good foragers.

History: William Cook, of Orpington, Kent, developed the Buff Duck for it's buff color, and to serve as an all-purpose duck. Runners, Aylesburys, Cayugas and Rouens were all used in the development of Buff Ducks. Mr. Cook was also the breeder who developed the Buff Orpington Chicken.

The Buff Duck was introduced in the United States at a poultry show in Madison Square Gardens in 1908. It was accepted into the American Poultry Association's Standard of Perfection in 1914. Interestingly, it is the only animal that the APA recognizes by a color-only name, and some members of the poultry fancy believe its official name should be "Orpington Duck," with Buff used to describe the variety.

While many of the people who raise Buffs do so for exhibition purposes, the breed is practical in the barnyard, as well. As commercial breeders focused on the Pekin for fast, profitable meat production, the Buff endured a drastic decline in numbers.

Colors: The word "buff" denotes a rich, brown color. Both the sexes have similarly colored plummage, with orangy-yellow legs and feet. The female has a brownish bill, while the drake's is yellow.

Status: The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy classifies the Buff Duck as Threatened, meaning there are fewer than seven primary breeding flocks.

Body Type: The Buff is a medium sized duck, with a long neck and a graceful body.

Standard Weights: Old Male 8 lbs, Old Female 7 lbs, Young Male 7 lbs, Young Female 6 lbs

American Poultry Association Class: Medium Duck



   


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