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Brown Egg Layers Rare

Dominique Chickens

Dominique Chickens

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Starting at: $3.18

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Price

Qty Discounts New Price
5-14$3.18 15-24$2.80 25-49$2.66 50-99$2.52 100+$2.38
* Discounts may vary based on options above
Qty: Min:  5
Dominique Chickens Details

Day Old Dominique Baby Chicks

Hatching February to November.

Apple pie, baseball, and Dominiques! As the oldest American breed, Dominiques hold a special place in the poultry fancy of this country. They are prized for their ability to forage, their egg laying abilities, and their ease of keeping. Dominiques have a rose comb and are a cold hardy breed.

Production: Dominiques are considered a dual purpose breed, but they are excellent layers, producing 180-260 brown eggs annually. Dominique hens are broody. They do grow to a good table weight, as well with a yellow skin color. Traditionally, homesteaders used their ample feathers for pillows and mattresses.

Temperament: Hens are known to be calm and reliable, but roosters can be quite protective. Some owners even report that roosters have killed small rodents, cats, or snakes! Dominique chickens are good foragers. 

History: This breed is so old, that no one can really say where it came from or how it was developed. Many believe that Dominiques came to this continent with the pilgrims, and they are even sometimes called Pilgrim Fowl, but there is no documentation or proof that they actually did arrive with the pilgrims.

In fact, no one even knows why they are called Dominiques. There are many myths and half-truths and theories about this much loved breed. What we do know for sure is that there have been Dominiques in this country for a very long time. The breed was a favorite with homesteaders because they are good foragers, good mothers, and generally easy to care for.

Dominiques survived the Great Depression, probably due to their self-sufficiency, but then began to decline in numbers. The development of the Plymouth Rock, and its rising popularity led many away from raising Dominiques. By the 1950s, they were very nearly extinct.

The efforts of dedicated breeders and a renewed interest in heritage breeds saved this iconic and distinctly American chicken. Today, there are healthy numbers of Dominiques, roaming around in small flocks and farmyards across the country!

APA Class: American

Color Description: The distinctive, irregular, black and white barred (“cuckoo”) pattern of the Dominique is one of it’s defining characteristics.

Conservation Status: Watch

Weight: Cockerel 6 lbs, Pullet 4 lbs