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Light Brahma Chickens

Light Brahma Chickens

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Starting at: $3.18

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Price

Qty Discounts New Price
5-14$3.18 15-24$2.80 25-49$2.66 50-99$2.52 100+$2.38
* Discounts may vary based on options above
Qty: Min:  5
Light Brahma Chickens Details

Day Old Light Brahma Baby Chicks

Hatching year round.

Brahmas are great for a small flock because they are excellent dual purpose chickens. They are also calm and gentle, getting along well with other chickens and with people. Brahmas have a pea comb and are a cold hardy breed.

Production: Brahmas are one of the heaviest breeds, weighing an average of 10 pounds. Their skin color is yellow. They are good layers, as well, and you can expect about 180-240 brown eggs each year from one hen. Brahma hens are also broody.

Temperament: Light Brahmas are known to be docile, sweet birds. They are easy to handle, calm, and almost regal in their bearing. Brahmas are also good foragers. 

History: It is believed that Brahmas originated in India, but no one knows for sure. As with most very old breeds, it’s early history is unknown. We do know that while the ancestors of the modern Light Brahmas may have come from India, the breed as we know it today was developed in the United States.

Brahmas have been prized for their size. In the 1850s, some Brahma roosters reached as much as 18 pounds in weight. That’s a lot of bird! The average size, then and now, was closer to 10 pounds, but some males do get heavier. Due to their size, they are not good fliers, and they do quite well in confinement.

Another advantage to raising Light Brahmas is their extreme hardiness. Their size, their feathering and their pea comb help them withstand very cold temperatures. They are also excellent winter layers, laying most of their eggs between October and May.

Light Brahmas were included in the first printing of the American Poultry Association’s Standard of Perfection in 1874. They were prized across the country until the 1930s, when their fairly slow rate of maturity led them to fall out of favor.

APA Class: Asiatic

Color Description: Light Brahmas are mainly white, but their hackles are black, with white edging on each feather and their tails are black. All Brahmas have feathered shanks and feet, making them better suited to drier areas.

Conservation Status: Watch

Weight: Cockerel 10 lbs, Pullet 8 lbs